1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 147

Barnes Foundation Archives 2012 - səhifə 3

səhifə3/147
tarix22.07.2018
ölçüsü3.05 Mb.

Albert C. Barnes Correspondence 1902-1951  ABC

- Page 7 -

a certified Francesco Ruggieri violin from the Rudolph Wurlitzer Company for Besekirskii to play

when in Merion. Usually, a small number of guests were invited to enjoy these musicales, some quite

distinguished such as Leopold Stokowski, conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra, and American

philosopher and educator John Dewey.

In the fall of 1917, Barnes enrolled in a post-graduate philosophy seminar taught by John Dewey (1859 –

1952) at Columbia University. The class consisted of ten students, each encouraged by Dewey to express

their opinions in the form of a round-table discussion. Barnes said that, “since the death of William

James, Dewey has been the unquestioned head of American philosophic thought, and he is simple,

plain, penetrating, inspiring and intensely interesting.”(13) Barnes and Dewey became close friends and

confidants, their friendship and correspondence eventually spanning more than three decades. In his

book, Democracy and Education (1916), Dewey asserted that while complex societies require the kind of

formal education that institutions provide, this type of learning separates students from a direct experience

with life. Inspired by Dewey, and with the encouragement of Dewey’s wife, Alice, Barnes decided to

expand his factory seminars into a more advanced experiment in education.

THE BARNES FOUNDATION

On October 13, 1922, Barnes purchased “Red-Slates,” the Joseph Lapsley Wilson (1844 – 1928) estate

situated on a fifteen acre arboretum near his home on Latch’s Lane. He received a charter from State

of Pennsylvania on December 4, 1922, to establish the Barnes Foundation, an educational institution

dedicated to promoting the appreciation of fine art and arboriculture. Barnes hired architect Paul Philippe

Cret (1876 – 1945) to design a residence and a gallery on the arboretum grounds. He immersed himself

in every step of the construction, from the selection of the building stone, Pouillenay and Coutarnoux,

shipped by steamer from France, to decisions regarding interior wall coverings. Barnes complained that

Cret’s exterior façade designs looked like “bull’s eyes” and replaced them with bas-relief sculptures

commissioned from artist Jacques Lipchitz (1891 – 1973). He engaged the Enfield Pottery and Tile

Works to create the ceramic tiles for the front portico of the gallery building, selecting both the tile colors

and the insets of African design elements such as the mask and crocodile motif from the Ivory Coast

Baule door (A238) in his collection.

Dr. Barnes acquired his vast collection of African art from Paris art dealer Paul Guillaume (1891 – 1934).

He most likely met Guillaume upon resuming his visits to France after the First World War, and the two

soon developed a friendly business relationship. Guillaume became Barnes’s principle agent in Paris,

handling purchases and exchanges with other dealers and eventually being named the Foundation’s

“Foreign Secretary.” In 1923, while the Foundation buildings were under construction, Barnes organized

an exhibition of his acquisitions of African art and Modern paintings at Guillaume’s gallery in Paris.

The Modern paintings, which were well received in France, unfortunately met with contempt from the

Philadelphia press when they were exhibited in the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in April of

that year.

Both Barnes and Guillaume published essays about the influence of African sculpture on the Modern

movement in art, a view that attracted the interest of notable African Americans such as Howard

University professor Alain Locke (1886 – 1954) and social activist Charles S. Johnson (1893 – 1956).

In early 1924, Johnson invited Barnes to a party in New York for young African American writers after

which they discussed providing scholarships for some to study African art. Barnes devised an educational

program, the “New Plan for Negro Education,” an idea which Charles S. Johnson proposed to James



Albert C. Barnes Correspondence 1902-1951  ABC

- Page 8 -

Weldon Johnson of the N.A.A.C.P.(14) Barnes contributed to and became a lifetime member of the

Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, directed by Carter G. Woodson,(15) and donated

generously – and anonymously – to the National Urban League in support of their journal, Opportunity: A Journal of Negro Life, edited by Charles S. Johnson.

While Barnes continued to manage the A.C. Barnes Company, to direct all aspects of the construction

of the Barnes Foundation buildings, and to collect remarkable works of art, he also began working on a

book that would become the primary text used in the Foundation’s educational program. Barnes hired

his former tutor, philosophy professor Laurence Buermeyer (1889 – 1970), to help with the structure of

the book, one he believed would be the first of its kind that “endeavored to attach the flesh and blood of

practical experience with paintings and with plain people.”(16) Barnes and Buermeyer shared common

intellectual interests – Barnes attended John Dewey’s seminars at Buermeyer’s suggestion – and their

relationship, while often troubled, remained constant over the years. Once Buermeyer completed the work

of organizing notes and editing drafts, he made yet another important suggestion to Barnes. He said, “I

like 'The Art in Painting' better than 'New Pictures from Old' as a title for the book… .”(17) The Art in Painting (1925) was published just weeks before the Barnes Foundation’s official opening.

Days after the Foundation first received its charter in 1922, Barnes expressed the idea of working with

area colleges to develop a synthesis of the philosophies of Dewey and Santayana, an adaptation for

the average student. He asked Laurence Buermeyer to provide further clarification to students visiting

the Gallery because he thought him to be “the best qualified intellectually to carry out the plan.”(18)

However, it was philosophy professor Thomas Munro (1897 – 1974) who taught the first classes

beginning in 1924, one offered through the University of Pennsylvania and the other at Columbia

University. Painter Sara Carles, sister of Philadelphia artist Arthur B. Carles, joined Mary Mullen on the

teaching staff, and Barnes himself began speaking for two hours in front of the paintings on Fridays and

Sundays. Also in the spring of that year, Barnes published the first Journal of the Barnes Foundation,

featuring articles by Buermeyer, Mary Mullen, and Munro.

The Barnes Foundation officially opened on March 19, 1925, with a celebration that took place on “a

beautiful sunshiny afternoon… [with] some two hundred people present.”(19) John Dewey, whom

Barnes asked to serve as “honorary” director of education, gave the first address. He noted that the

Foundation’s focus was, in fact, a culmination of Barnes’s enduring interest in education, an extension

of the experimental classes held in the laboratories of A.C. Barnes Company, and he also emphasized

Barnes’s continued commitment to African Americans and “every-day people.”(20) When Barnes asked

Leopold Stokowski to speak on behalf of all artists, he explained why:

Stokowski said, “I will do it because I believe in your idea.”(22)

DR. BARNES AND MUSIC

When Barnes introduced music to his Sunday afternoon talks – reminiscent of the Sunday musicales

at “Lauraston” – it emphasized Buermeyer’s assertion that art was only one manifestation of the

Foundation’s interest in total human development. Barnes said, “It’s amazing how close are the

affiliations between music and paintings,”(23) and, with recordings, demonstrated the kinship between

Mozart and Prendergast, Beethoven and Cézanne, Gluck and Renoir, and Picasso and African American

spirituals. He must have welcomed the opportunity to introduce his students to spirituals, music he clearly

loved. Barnes said, “When I was about eight years old, I went to a negro camp meeting and have never



Dostları ilə paylaş:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


bassam-jamous---bet-2.html

bassano-del-grappa-2.html

basse-saxe--autres.html

bassejn-r-pokshi---lesnoj.html

bassejn-reki-2.html